How many Bitcoin are mined per day?

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All times approximate.

Each block takes ten minutes, so there are six blocks per hour, 24 hours per day. The original block reward was 50 BTC. Thus, 7200 BTC per day introduced to the system.

I contrived this script to model the decline, including the year the halving is expected to occur:

ruby -e 'reward = 7200.0; halving = 0; while halving < 33 do puts "Halving "+halving.to_s + " (" + (2008 + 4 * halving).to_s + ") : %2.8f"%reward; reward = reward / 2; halving += 1; end' Start (2009) : 7200.00000000 #start Halving 1 (2012) : 3600.00000000 #Halving was November 2012 Halving 2 (2016) : 1800.00000000 Halving 3 (2020) : 900.00000000 Halving 4 (2024) : 450.00000000 Halving 5 (2028) : 225.00000000 Halving 6 (2032) : 112.50000000 Halving 7 (2036) : 56.25000000 Halving 8 (2040) : 28.12500000 Halving 9 (2044) : 14.06250000 Halving 10 (2048) : 7.03125000 Halving 11 (2052) : 3.51562500 Halving 12 (2056) : 1.75781250 Halving 13 (2060) : 0.87890625 Halving 14 (2064) :...
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Jan 2009 – Mar 2010 basically none No exchanges or market, users were mainly cryptography fans who were sending bitcoins for hobby purposes representing low or no value. In March 2010, user “SmokeTooMuch” auctioned 10,000 BTC for $50 (cumulatively), but no buyer was found.[135][136] Apr 2010 $0.003 On 25 Apr 2010, the now-defunct BitcoinMarket.com exchange is the first one that starts operating. May 2010 less than $0.01 On 22 May 2010,[137] Laszlo Hanyecz made the first real-world transaction by buying two pizzas in Jacksonville, Florida for 10,000 BTC.[138][139][140] July 2010 $0.08 In five days, the price grew 1000%, rising from $0.008 to $0.08 for 1 bitcoin. Feb 2011 – April 2011 $1.00 Bitcoin takes parity with US dollar.[141] 8 July 2011 $31.00 top of first “bubble”, followed by the first price drop Dec 2011 $2.00 minimum after few months Dec 2012 $13.00 slowly rising for a year 11 April 2013 $266 top of a price rally, during which the value was growing by 5-10% daily. May 2013...
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Before we start, if you’re new to Bitcoin mining and don’t know what it is watch this short and simple explanation:

“Is Bitcoin Mining Profitable in 2017?“

The short answer would be “It depends on how much you’re willing to spend”. Each person asking himself this will get a slightly different answer since Bitcoin Mining profitability depends on many different factors. In order to find out Bitcoin mining profitability for different factors “mining profitability calculators” were invented.

These calculators take into account the different parameters such as electricity cost, the cost of your hardware and other variables and give you an estimate of your projected profit. Before I give you a short example of how this is calculated let’s make sure you are familiar with the different variables:

Hash Rate – A Hash is the mathematical problem the miner’s computer needs to solve. The Hash Rate is the rate at which these problems are being solved. The more...

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You probably know that mining is the only way that Bitcoin comes into the world. You buy them, you exchange them for something else, and you earn them or even steal them. You send them per global network like mail. Thousands of coins trade hundreds of transactions per single second. However, someone created every single Bitcoin in the past. It may be a huge data center with hundreds of coolers and chips, it might be a self-miner, or it may be a mining pool with thousands of members around the world. Every solved block creates 25 Bitcoins at a time. How much time does it take to mine at least one of them? That is an important question.

Factors

To answer this question, we need to understand what factors affect the duration of mining Bitcoins and its success.

We won’t discuss solo mining because until you have a lot of the latest ASICs, it’s almost impossible to solve a block. Even if you have the newest ASICs, it’s still too difficult.

That’s why we’re...

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The Bitcoin block reward refers to the new bitcoins distributed by the network to miners for each successfully solved block.

How is the Block Reward Determined?

Satoshi Nakamoto, Bitcoin’s creator, set the block reward schedule when he created Bitcoin. It is one of Bitcoin’s central rules and cannot be changed without agreement between the entire Bitcoin network.

The block reward started at 50 BTC in block #1 and halves every 210,000 blocks. This means every block up until block #210,000 rewards 50 BTC, while block 210,001 rewards 25. Since blocks are mined on average every 10 minutes, 144 blocks are mined per day on average. At 144 blocks per day, 210,000 blocks take on average four years to mine.

Total circulation will be 21,000,000 coins. It’ll be distributed to network nodes when they make blocks, with the amount cut in half every 4 years. first 4 years: 10,500,000 coins next 4 years: 5,250,000 coins next 4 years: 2,625,000 coins next 4 years:...

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Bitcoin isn’t wasting electricity. Well, at least not as much as everyone says it is. What it is doing is much harder to figure. But let’s try.

The claim that Bitcoin was a huge waste of electricity were based on widely quoted statistics from Blockchain.info—now removed from the site but still wildly cited by commentators such as PandoDaily. These figures are simply wrong, and some simple math shows this, if anyone had bothered to check.

Bitcoin works by solving cryptographical math puzzles the hard way in order to secure its transaction record. A distributed computer network, comprised of every computer that is “mining” Bitcoin, processes individual “hashes” looking for the solution, and when the problem is solved, the network moves onto the next problem. There is no way to fake transactions, without having more computers than all of the network combined. The network reports how much computing power is working on the problem via the global hashrate, which is how fast...

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The claim that Bitcoin is a huge waste of electricity was based on flawed calculations.

Bitcoin isn't wasting electricity. Well, at least not as much as everyone says it is. What it is doing is much harder to figure. But let's try.

The claim that Bitcoin was a huge waste of electricity were based on widely quoted statistics from Blockchain.info—now removed from the site, but which are still wildly cited by commentators such as PandoDaily. These figures are simply wrong, and some simple math shows this, if anyone had bothered to check.

Bitcoin works by solving cryptographical math puzzles the hard way in order to secure its transaction record. A distributed computer network, comprised of every computer that is “mining” Bitcoin, processes individual “hashes” looking for the solution, and when the problem is solved, the network moves onto the next problem. There is no way to fake transactions, without having more...

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When mining began, regular off-the-shelf PCs were fast enough to generate bitcoins. That's the way the system was set up—easier to mine in the beginning, harder to mine as more bitcoins are generated. Over the last few years, miners have had to move on to faster hardware in order to keep generating new bitcoins. Today, application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC) are being used. Programmer language aside, all this means is that the hardware is designed for one specific task—in this case mining.

New faster hardware is being created by various mining start-ups at a rapid rate and the price tag for a full mining rig—capable of discovering new bitcoins on its own—currently costs in the ballpark of $12,000.

(Read more: How to make your email as stealth as Edward Snowden)

There is a way around such a hefty investment: joining mining pools. Pools are a collective group of bitcoin miners from around the globe who literally pool their computer power together to...

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What is 'Bitcoin'

Bitcoin is a digital currency created in 2009. It follows the ideas set out in a white paper by the mysterious Satoshi Nakamoto, whose true identity has yet to be verified. Bitcoin offers the promise of lower transaction fees than traditional online payment mechanisms and is operated by a decentralized authority, unlike government-issued currencies. Today's market cap for all bitcoin (abbreviated BTC or, less frequently, XBT) in circulation exceeds $7 billion.

There are no physical bitcoins, only balances kept on a public ledger in the cloud, that – along with all Bitcoin transactions – is verified by a massive amount of computing power. Bitcoins are not issued or backed by any banks or governments, nor are individual bitcoins valuable as a commodity. Despite its not being legal tender, Bitcoin charts high on popularity, and has triggered the launch of other virtual currencies collectively referred to as Altcoins.

BREAKING DOWN...

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Bitcoin generator is a software, that will help you earn Bitcoins without having to invest thousands of dollars in mining equipment or buying Bitcoins. Bitcoins are "mined" by special devices designed for that purpose. The problem is, that those devices costs a lot of money and the electricity usage is very high, so thats another expense to keep in mind. Therefore not everyone can get Bitcoins through mining.

But since we believe in Bitcoin, we wanted that everyone has a chance to earn Bitcoins, and thats when BTC4GEN was born. With BTC4GEN everyone can generate Bitcoins without having to invest thousands in mining equipment. Simply download our Bitcoin generator and let it generate Bitcoins for...

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On March 16th, the Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiades, who’d been in office for about a month, announced a strategy to solve the country’s banking crisis. This plan, which would be funded in part by confiscating money directly from every single bank account in Cyprus—even the very smallest—met with instantaneous and violent opposition from the country’s citizens. Offstage, the European Union, led by a group of adamant Germans, Finns, and Danes, as well as the I.M.F. and the European Central Bank, pointed a cannon at Anastasiades’s head: if he didn’t move forward with this plan, the Cyprus banks would go bust and their hapless customers would lose pretty much all their money, instead of a measly 6.75 per cent. However, under great pressure from their constituents, Cypriot M.P.s rejected the proposal and sent Anastasiades back to the drawing board.

The following Monday, the price of the decentralized electronic currency bitcoin rose from...

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